Orbital Cellulitis Orbital Cellulitis
The Free Medical Dictionary

Orbital cellulitis A very serious infection, called orbital cellulitis, occurs when bacteria enter and infect the tissues surrounding the eye. In 50-70% of all cases of orbital cellulitis, the infection spreads to the eye(s) from the sinuses or the upper respiratory tract (nose and throat). Twenty-five percent of orbital infections occur after surgery on the face. Other sources of orbital infection include a direct infection from an eye injury, from a dental or throat infection, and through the bloodstream. Infection of the tissues surrounding the eye causes redness, swollen eyelids, severe pain, and causes the eye to bulge out. This serious infection can lead to a temporary loss of vision, blindness, brain abscesses, inflammation of the brain and spinal tissues (meningitis), and other complications. Before the discovery of antibiotics, orbital cellulitis caused blindness in 20% of patients and death in 17% of patients. Antibiotic treatment has significantly reduced the incidence of blindness and death.